News

Mar 28, 2012
ChEMS Assistant Professor’s Research Featured in Two Journal Cover Articles

Ali Mohraz featured in cover articles in Advanced Materials and Langmuir

Assistant Professor Ali Mohraz, Ph.D., Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, has had his research on interfacial colloid assembly featured as cover articles in the journals Advanced Materials and Langmuir.

Particle self-assembly at liquid interfaces is a complex phenomenon involving elements of interfacial phenomena, suspension mechanics and thermodynamics. A better understanding of the interplay between these various elements can pave the way for new applications of these multi-phase systems in diverse technologies including drug delivery, personal care, oil industries and food products.

Mar 23, 2012
ChEMS Assistant Professor Receives Nuclear Energy University Programs Award

Mikael Nilsson receives award from the U.S. Department of Energy

Assistant Professor Mikael Nilsson, Ph.D., Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, has received a Research and Development Award from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP).

Nilsson’s proposal entitledMicroemulsions and Aggregation Formation in Extraction Processes for Used Nuclear Fuel: Thermodynamic and Structural Studies”is related to chemical processing of used nuclear fuel. The project goal is to study the formation of chemical aggregates that may cause upsets in the process.

Mar 22, 2012
Assistant Professor Receives Editors’ Choice Award from Water Resources Research Journal

Jasper Vrugt’s paper is one of five honored nationally

Assistant Professor Jasper A. Vrugt, Ph.D., Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering with a joint appointment in Earth System Science, co-authored a paper entitled “Optimization and uncertainty assessment of strongly nonlinear groundwater models with high parameter dimensionality, ” that has been awarded an Editors’ Choice Award from the journal Water Resources Research.

The article discusses a proposed methodology for parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis algorithms to understand and predict flow and transport through aquifers.

Mar 14, 2012
Dean Gregory Washington Invited to White House

Washington is one of over 40 engineering deans participating in event

Dean Gregory N. Washington, Ph.D., The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, was one of over 40 engineering school deans invited to attend a White House event to celebrate the efforts of engineering deans for their commitment to retain and graduate more students in the field of engineering.

This event was part of a public-private initiative by the President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness (Jobs Council) to address the nation’s shortage of engineers. The goal is to yield 10,000 more engineering graduates in the United States annually. 

Mar 9, 2012
Engineering Student Council Honors Ten at Annual Awards Banquet

Five faculty members and five students honored by ESC

Mar 7, 2012
Three Doctoral Students Earn Public Impact Fellowships

Three engineering doctoral students improving the lives of the community

Mar 1, 2012
Adjunct Professor Robert H. Liebeck Receives Brigadier General Charles E. “Chuck” Yeager International Aeronautical Achievement Award

Award presented at National Engineers Week Banquet

Robert H. Liebeck, Ph.D., adjunct professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) and Senior Fellow at The Boeing Company, was nominated by Brigadier General Charles E. Yeager to receive the 2012 Brigadier General Charles E. “Chuck” Yeager International Aeronautical Achievement Award presented by The Engineers’ Council, during the National Engineers Week Honors & Awards Banquet in Universal City, Calif., on Saturday, February 25, 2012. The award was presented by Colonel Dawn M. Dunlop, Commander, 412th Test Wing, Air Force Flight Test Center, Edwards Air Force Base.

Feb 28, 2012
Mending a Broken Heart
Ph.D. candidate Aaron Chen wins Public Impact Fellowship for cardiac patch research

Since stem cells were first discovered to be a basis of new medical treatments, researchers have touted their potential to repair the human heart.

Millions of Americans suffer heart attacks each year, and those who survive never fully recover. Left behind is scarred and dead tissue that never mends, and research has focused on utilizing stem cells to initiate new growth.

UC Irvine doctoral candidate Cheng-Wei “Aaron” Chen is pursuing another approach. He believes that human embryonic stem cells can be used to create tissue — a sort of cardiac patch that could be grafted onto damaged heart areas and stimulate regrowth.

Feb 24, 2012
Researching Particle-laden Turbulent Flows

Professor Said Elghobashi researches the vaporization rate of fuel droplets in a turbulent flow

Professor Said Elghobashi, Ph.D., D.Sc., Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, is researching the two-way interactions between vaporizing droplets and turbulent flows using fully resolved, direct numerical simulation (DNS). The study is of particular relevance to liquid fuel spray combustion that is the predominant energy source in transportation systems. His main objective is to understand the effect of turbulence on the rate of droplet vaporization, which is the main controlling mechanism of the entire combustion process, as well as the effect of droplets on turbulence.

Feb 21, 2012
Samueli School Celebrates National Engineers Week

E-Week celebrated at events all week

Feb 21, 2012
Samueli School Showcases Three Projects at Homecoming Street Festival

Samueli School projects improve lives

Feb 16, 2012
How Vortices Form in our Cardiovascular System and How They Contribute to Our Health

Arash Kheradvar co-authors book entitled “Vortex Formation in the Cardiovascular System”

Assistant Professor Arash Kheradvar, M.D., Ph.D., The Edwards Lifesciences Center for Advanced Cardiovascular Technology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, has co-authored Vortex Formation in the Cardiovascular System.

Vortices occur in nature wherever propulsive flow exists, from erupting volcanoes to ones generated by squid and jellyfish to propel themselves. There has been particular interest in the wide variety of vortices that develop in the cardiovascular system, particularly in the cardiac chambers and in large arteries. These vortices play fundamental roles in normal physiology and provide proper balance between blood motion and stresses on the surrounding tissues. 

Feb 9, 2012
Undergraduate Student Participates in Hispanic College Fund’s Annual Gala

Lucía Díaz was one of 24 students from across the country to attend

Feb 8, 2012
CEE Department Producing Quality Research Across the Board

Data shows CEE has high ranking programs

Brett F. Sanders, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, analyzed last fall the scholarly achievements of the four program areas of the department: Environmental Engineering, Hydrology and Water Resources, Structural Engineering and Transportation Systems Engineering.

Sanders was motivated by the inadequacy of existing rankings, which he found either too subjective or too broad for meaningful assessment at the program level of detail. His attention turned to an index that he calls “quality productivity.” 

Feb 3, 2012
Samueli School Student Project Receives Award from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Professor Sunny Jiang leads student team to EPA award

Feb 2, 2012
BME Professor Published Article in Nature Photonics

Michael W. Berns published in Nature Photonics journal

Professor Michael W. Berns, Ph.D., Department of Biomedical Engineering in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, and his research team have had an article published online in the Nature Photonics journal and it isthe cover story of the journals January 2012 print issue.

Berns and his colleagues use an optically driven micromotor to study the control of nerve fiber movement called axons. The micromotor relies on the use of circularly polarized light with angular momentum to trap and spin a birefringent particle to create a controlled amount of microfluidic shear force against a living cell. Berns and his team of researchers demonstrated that the growth of a single nerve cell turns in a specific direction related to the micromotor spin direction and subsequent microfluidic flow direction.

Jan 31, 2012
Jay Famiglietti Selected as 2012 Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer

Professor to give lectures internationally on global water cycle change and freshwater availability

Professor James S. (Jay) Famiglietti, Ph.D., Department of Earth System Science in the School of Physical Sciences, and a joint appointment in in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, has been selected as the 2012 Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer.

The lectureship is made to one person annually by the Geological Society of America(GSA) Hydrogeology Division. Famiglietti is the 34th GSA Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer and plans to give 50 lectures during his tour.

Jan 30, 2012
Little Chip, Big Implications
TechPortal startup offers technology breakthrough with vast market potential

It was November 2008, and doctoral student Fred Tzeng was brainstorming research projects with his adviser, Payam Heydari, UC Irvine professor of electrical engineering and computer science. After much discussion, they conceived of a concept – a way to more intelligently convert analog signals (sound, light, heat, motion) to the digital format required by modern electronics, using 10 times less power than the current conversion process.

If it worked, their low-power analog-to-digital converter technology would extend battery life, enhance functionality and lower the cost of portable electronics.

Jan 27, 2012
Undergraduate Student Wins Women's Transportation Seminar Scholarship

Cunxiang (Nicole) Mi wins WTS Orange County Scholarship

Jan 25, 2012
H. Kumar Wickramasinghe Awarded $1 Million Keck Foundation Grant

Funds to create a live cell genomics laboratory

The Henry Samueli Endowed Chair H. Kumar Wickramasinghe, Ph.D., has been awarded a $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to develop new equipment for analysis of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels in space and time within a living cell.

Wickramasinghe’s project entitled “Platform for Targeting and Quantifying Gene Expression Levels in Living Systems” describes the three-year plan to create the Single-Cell Analyzer (SCA) which will have applications in areas ranging from developmental and systems biology to personalized medicine, cancer diagnosis and stem cell research.

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