Graduate Study in Biomedical Engineering

Master of Science 

The Master of Science degree requires conducting a focused research project and completing designated coursework.  Students must select a thesis advisor and complete an original research investigation including a written thesis, and obtain approval of the thesis by a thesis committee.  In addition, the students must successfully complete a minimum of 42 units (refer to core and elective courses below) of course work beyond the bachelor's degree.

Doctor of Philosophy 

The Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering requires the achievement of an original and significant body of research that advances the discipline, and which culminates in the oral and written presentation of a dissertation. Students may enter the Ph.D. program with a B.S. degree in engineering, biological science, or physical sciences from either UCI or another university.  At the end of Year One, each student will match with a faculty advisor (from the list of Core and Affiliated faculty) and an individual program of study will be designed by the student and a faculty advisory committee. Six milestones are required for the Ph.D.:

  1. successful completion of 42 units (refer to core and elective courses below) of course work beyond the bachelor’s degree;
  2. successful completion of a preliminary exam;
  3. selecting an area of specialization, taking two depth courses and three quarters of the BME seminar series;
  4. formal advancement to candidacy by successfully passing a qualifying exam;
  5. presentation of current research in BME seminar series, and;
  6. completion of a significant body of original research and the submission of a written and an oral defense of an acceptable dissertation.

Advancement to candidacy must be completed by the end of summer of the second academic year. Special exceptions can be made, but a formal request with justification must be supplied in writing to the BME Graduate Advisor. The qualifying exam will consist of an oral and written presentation of original work completed thus far, and a coherent plan for completing a body of original research. The exam will be presented to the student's graduate advisory committee. The graduate advisory committee will be selected by the student and faculty advisor and must have a minimum of five faculty members (including the faculty advisor). Of these five  faculty members, three must be core biomedical engineering faculty. In addition, one  faculty member must have his/her primary appointment outside the Department of Biomedical Engineering but can be a BME-affiliated faculty and the fifth member must have his/her primary appointment outside of the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and cannot be a BME-affiliated faculty . The qualifying exam will follow campus and Henry Samueli School of Engineering guidelines.

The Ph.D. will be awarded upon submission of a written and an oral defense of an acceptable dissertation. The degree will be granted upon the recommendation of the graduate advisory committee and the Dean of Graduate Studies. Completion of the Ph.D is expected in the fifth year following completion of the B.S. degree, although a maximum of seven years (28 academic quarters) is allowed.
 

M.D. / Ph.D. 

A combined M.D./Ph.D. degree is offered in conjunction with the UCI College of Medicine. The program combines clinical training and research experience. Students who complete this program will be awarded both an M.D. degree from the College of Medicine and a Ph.D. degree from the School of Engineering. More information is available on the UCI Medical Scientist Training Program web page. Applications should be made to the UCI Medical Scientist Training Program and applicants should state that their chosen graduate department is Biomedical Engineering.

Biomedical Engineering Core Courses 

As part of the course requirements for the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, all students will be required to complete 36 course units. These units include 6 core classes and three quarters of the BME seminar series, two elective course classes and four units of independent research. A successful biomedical engineer is able to describe and analyze biomedical and biological systems in a quantitative fashion. Thus, at a minimum, a biomedical engineer must demonstrate competence in quantitative analysis, biological and biomedical structure and function, and an awareness of the clinical environment. The core courses and descriptions are as follows:

BME 210: Cell & Tissue Engineering (4 units)
A biochemical, biophysical, and molecular view of cell biology.  Topics include the biochemistry and biophysical properties of cells, the extracellular matrix, biological signal transduction, and principles of engineering new tissues.

BME 220: Quantitative Physiology: Sensory Motor Systems (4 units)
A quantitative and systems approach to understanding physiological systems.  Systems covered include the nervous and musculoskeletal systems.

BME 221: Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (4 units)
A quantitative and systems approach to understanding physiological systems. Systems covered include the cardiopulmonary, circulatory, and renal systems. Same as CBEMS204.

BME 230A: Applied Engineering Mathematics I (4 units)
Analytical techniques applied to engineering problems in transport phenomena, process dynamics and control and thermodynamics.

BME 230B: Applied Engineering Mathematics II (4 units)
Advanced engineering mathematics for biomedical engineering. Focuses on biomedical system identification. Includes fundamental techniques of model building and testing such as formulation, solution of governing equations (emphasis on basic numerical techniques), sensitivity theory, identifiability theory, and uncertainty analysis.

BME 240: Introduction to Clinical Medicine for Biomedical Engineering (4 units)
An introduction to clinical medicine for graduate students in biomedical engineering. Divided between lectures focused on applications of advanced technology to clinical problems and a series of four rotations through the operating room, ICU, interventional radiology/imaging, and endoscopy.

BME 298: Seminars in Biomedical Engineering (2 units)
Presentation of advanced topics and reports of current research efforts in biomedical engineering. Designed for graduate students in the biomedical engineering program. Required course for Years One and Two.

Elective Courses 

The two elective courses required to fulfill the course requirements for the M.S. and Ph.D. degree will be comprised of courses offered within the School of Engineering, School of Biological Science, School of Physical Science, or College of Medicine.  The group of elective courses must be approved by the BME Graduate Advisor (see Important People and Contacts in the Graduate Student Handbook). The courses will be chosen to meet the specific needs of the student. The electives must provide breadth in biomedical engineering, but also provide specific skills necessary to the specific research the student may undertake as part of the degree requirements. Potential elective courses are listed on our website. Additional courses (including upper division undergraduate courses) not listed may be selected upon approval by the student's advisory committee. Below is a select list of courses that are of particular interest. 

BME 213: Systems Cell & Developmental Biology (4 units) Winter
BME 233: Dynamic Systems in Biology & Medicine (4 units) Fall
BME 234: Neuroimaging Data Analysis (4 units) Spring
BME 236: Engineering Optics for Biomedical Applications (4 units) Winter
BME 247: Microfluids and Lab-on-A-Chip (4 units) Winter
BME 248: Micro Implant (4 units) Spring
BME 249: Biomedical Microdevices I (4 units) Fall
BME 295: Bio-Spectroscopy (4 units) Spring
BME 295: Imaging Principles (4 units) Fall
BME 295: Introduction to Computational Biology (4 units) Fall
BME 295: Medical Techniques I (4 units) Winter
BME 295: Medical Techniques II (4 units) Spring
BME 295: Biofluid Mechanics (4 units) Winter
BME 295: Multi-Time Variant Systems (4 units) Winter
BME 295: Linking Modeling & Experiments in Bioengineering (4 units) Spring

Special Courses

Besides the formal lecture oriented courses that comprise the core and elective requirements, there are a series of special courses in which you will enroll at various times during your study (see description below). These special course titles are listed below. 

BME 296: Masters of Science Thesis Research (1-16 units – F, W, S Quarters )
Individual research or investigation conducted in the pursuit or preparing and completing the thesis required for the M.S. degree in Engineering. May be repeated for credit.

BME 297: Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation Research (1-16 units – F, W, S Quarters )
Individual research or investigation conducted in the pursuit of preparing and completing the dissertation required for the Ph.D. in Engineering. May be repeated for credit.

BME 298: Seminar in Biomedical Engineering (2 units – F, W, S Quarters)
Presentation of advanced topics and reports of current research efforts in biomedical engineering. Designed for graduate students in the biomedical engineering program. Required course for Years One and Two.

BME 299: Individual Research (1-16 units – F, W, S Quarters)
Individual research or investigation under the direction of an individual faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (The course code will vary depending on the instructor with whom you will enroll).

If you are interested in courses offered outside of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, refer to the General Catalogue for more information.

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Graduate Handbook 2014153.39 KB